Carry of the Month – October 2015: Jordan Back Carry with variations

What:    Jordan Back Carry and its variations

When:   31 days of October

Where: Start at Tucson Babywearers and take it anywhere you like!

Why:      It’s not because you can do it with any size wrap.

It’s not because you can do so many pretty and useful finishes with it.

It’s not because it prevents both leaning back and seat popping.

It’s because JBC is a wonderfully supportive and relatively easy to learn back carry that uses three basic types of passes (rebozo pass, cross pass, and horizontal pass) that would help you move your babywearing skills to a new level!

Now the details. For a basic Jordan Back Carry you need a base-1 size wrap (4 for petite ladies, 5 for average sized, and 6 for plus sized). You can always use a longer wrap if you have one, you’ll just have longer tails hanging from the knot. The other way of thinking about it is that you need a wrap one size longer than what you use for a ruck tied in front.

The carry starts like a ruck. You put your baby on your back by an age appropriate method that you are comfortable with (santa toss for smaller children, superman toss or hip scoot for older children). Then make a good deep seat by pulling the fabric down taut over the baby’s butt and flipping it under the baby. Since the first pass is a rebozo pass, you would bring one of the tails under your arm. Conversely you can start with one tail over your shoulder and one under your arm, and make the seat then.

Now it’s your chance to perfect your shoulder flip skills. Hold the whole width of the wrap taut under your arm, flip it over your shoulder, grab the top rail of the wrap to hold tight and spread the width of the wrap over the baby’s back. Since the second pass is a cross pass, you bring the whole width of the wrap under the baby’s back. Now you have a short tail coming from under your arm and a longer one coming over the same arm.

For the horizontal pass you take the long tail and bring it across the baby’s back so that it comes under the other arm. To finish tie it off in front with a double knot.

Things to keep in mind:

  1. Try to make a good seat from the start. You’ll reinforce it by a cross pass and a horizontal pass later, but having a good seat from the beginning makes the rest of the wrapping easier. Practice making your seat first over a soft surface or/and with a spotter who doesn’t panic easily.
  2. If you feel like your arms are too short to do shoulder flip and subsequently spread the wrap, try to work wide. That is, hold the wrap with both hands, use your elbows. Once it’s high enough you can always tighten the wrap job to your desire.
  3. To make the carry symmetric (since the ways a rebozo pass and a cross pass turn out are slightly different, especially since you’ll be doing them on the opposite sides) make the last pass a reinforcing pass instead of a horizontal pass. To do that, bring the wrap across the baby’s back, but instead of going over the leg, go under the leg.
  4. Don’t forget about pretty and useful variations.
  5. Have fun with it! JBC is a great way to show off both sides of a wrap.

Most useful variations (according to me):

Tied Tibetan: if you feel like the ruck straps fall off, if you have to accommodate a growing pregnant belly, if your wrap is slightly longer and you want to use it up, or if you just got an unseemly stain on the front of your shirt, do the Tibetan finish!  To do it, instead of tying off in front bring the tails across your chest and put them through the ruck straps. Then you can tie them off in the middle or do a knotless finish.

JBC with a ring: if don’t like even the idea of ruck straps, like more weight to be on your sternum and not shoulders, and if you have a slightly longer wrap, do the ring variation. To do it, once you have the first rebozo pass put both tails of the wrap through a large ring (use only rings designated for babywearing) and proceed as with the basic carry. You can tie it off in front or do a knotless finish through the ring.

Half-JBC: if you only have a shorty, are on the move, don’t have time to deal with tails, etc., this is for you. All you do is stop after the first two passes and tie off the carry at the shoulder with a double knot, a slip knot or do a candy cane chest belt. Another good thing about the Half-JBC is that it can be done without the shoulder flip.

Now to the instructional videos:

Basic JBC:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_6cO_gQctY

JBC with a ring:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ai6I1o-sMWE

Half-JBC:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OcshSFS7HhI

Half-JBC without a shoulder flip:

~ Valentina

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Carry of the Week: Short Back Cross Carry

COTW for the week of August 12th is: Short Back Cross Carry (SBCC)

Our featured carry this week is Short Back Cross Carry (SBCC). As with Christina’s Ruckless last week, we are starting to work with some carries that will fall into the “advanced babywearing” category, so if a particular carry looks intimidating or you try it and quite get it right, don’t give up! It takes practice, and those of us who have successfully mastered this carry probably looked and felt just like you the first time we tried it!

SBCC is a back carry that can be done with a short wrap: size 2-4, depending on the size of the wearer and child, and what “finish” you choose (tied at shoulder or “candy cane” chest belt).

Safety: Stretchy/Knit Wraps (like the Moby) should not, under any circumstances, be used for back carries as their stretchy quality makes them unsafe for anything other than front and hip carries. Keep in mind that if this is your first time doing a back carry, or even this particular carry, you should have a spotter and/or practice over a soft surface such as a bed or a couch. You may even want to practice with a doll or stuffed animal first until you feel comfortable.

Short Back Cross Carry, Tied at Shoulder (TAS)

Short Back Cross Carry with a Candy Cane Chest Belt (CCCB)

Carry Of The Week: Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry

COTW for the week of August 5th is: Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry

This week our carry of the week is Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry (CRBC). As we proceed with our Carry of the Week, we are starting to work with some carries that will fall into the “advanced babywearing” category, so if a particular carry looks intimidating or you try it and quite get it right, don’t give up! It takes practice, and those of us who have successfully mastered this carry probably looked and felt just like you the first time we tried it!

Christina’s Ruckless is a multi-layer back carry that can be an extremely comfortable carry for those who don’t like ruck straps. It is supportive and also a great solution for those leg-straightening babies and toddlers! It is fairly similar to Secure High Back Carry (SHBC), but doesn’t have a knot in the chest belt, so may be a little more comfortable for those bothered by that feature of SHBC.

Christina’s Ruckless can be completed using a size 4-6 wrap, depending on the size of the wearer and child. Please visit our Facebook Group Page for any questions or advice on this carry!

Safety: Stretchy/Knit Wraps (like the Moby) should not, under any circumstances, be used for back carries as their stretchy quality makes them unsafe for anything other than front and hip carries. Keep in mind that if this is your first time doing a back carry, or even this particular carry, you should have a spotter and/or practice over a soft surface such as a bed or a couch. You may even want to practice with a doll or stuffed animal first until you feel comfortable.

Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry

Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry

COTW: Double Hammock (DH)

DH1 DH4 DH3 DH2

COTW for the week of July 15th is: Double Hammock (DH)

This week’s carry is one of the most popular (and supportive) back carries. The Double Hammock (DH) – also called a Chunei Back Carry – is a great back carry that keeps both toddlers and babies nice and secure, and most woven wrap babywearers will tell you how much they love a Double Hammock! This carry uses a longer wrap and includes two rebozo passes across baby’s back, a horizontal chest pass, and ruck-style shoulder straps.

Why we like it…the Double Hammock centers the weight to your chest so you aren’t using just your shoulders for support. It’s multilayered, making it fabulous to support a heavier child or carry for lengthy periods of time. The DH is also great for those wiggle worms and ideal for small babies and bigger ones alike.

Generally considered one of the most comfortable carries, the Double Hammock has a bit of a learning curve, but it’s one back carry definitely worth learning! The key to a good Double Hammock is a nice snug chest pass. It may take a few tries, but once you get this carry down, you’ll love the support it gives!

We have featured not only the classic carry to learn and review, but also a few interesting variations and finishes. A different finish or chest belt can redistribute weight and change the feel of the entire carry. Try it out and let us know what you think!

Check back in next week to see what wrap carry we’ll feature next!

Safety: Stretchy/Knit Wraps must not be used for Back Carries. Please keep in mind that if this is your first time doing a back carry, or even this particular carry, you should have a spotter and/or practice over a soft surface such as a bed or a couch. You can even practice with a doll or stuffed animal first until you feel comfortable.

Double Hammock with a Woven Wrap

Double Hammock with Tips for a Snug Chest Pass

Double Hammock Tied at Shoulder (DH TAS)

Double Hammock Tied at Shoulder (DH TAS)

Double Hammock with a Toddler

Double Hammock: Alternate Finishes
Double Hammock: Tied Tibetan and Sternum Strap Chestbelt

Double Hammock Double Rings (DH-DR)

Double Hammock Rebozo

Double Hammock Rebozo with Sling Ring Finish

“Wrapping 360” by Babywearing 102

Front Wrap Cross Carry (FWCC)

Check out this amazing collaboration from the Facebook group, Babywearing 102! Tucson Babywearer’s is also proud to say that two of our members, Cybil and Chyna, were a part of making this fabulous project happen, and we couldn’t be more excited!

“Wrapping 360” is a pictorial illustrating some of the most common woven wrap carries from all angles including clickable links to videos and tutorials for the individual carries.

Click on the link below for a full view of the Wrapping 360 PDF file and let us know what you think!
Wrapping 360 by Babywearing 102