Carry of the Week: Short Back Cross Carry

COTW for the week of August 12th is: Short Back Cross Carry (SBCC)

Our featured carry this week is Short Back Cross Carry (SBCC). As with Christina’s Ruckless last week, we are starting to work with some carries that will fall into the “advanced babywearing” category, so if a particular carry looks intimidating or you try it and quite get it right, don’t give up! It takes practice, and those of us who have successfully mastered this carry probably looked and felt just like you the first time we tried it!

SBCC is a back carry that can be done with a short wrap: size 2-4, depending on the size of the wearer and child, and what “finish” you choose (tied at shoulder or “candy cane” chest belt).

Safety: Stretchy/Knit Wraps (like the Moby) should not, under any circumstances, be used for back carries as their stretchy quality makes them unsafe for anything other than front and hip carries. Keep in mind that if this is your first time doing a back carry, or even this particular carry, you should have a spotter and/or practice over a soft surface such as a bed or a couch. You may even want to practice with a doll or stuffed animal first until you feel comfortable.

Short Back Cross Carry, Tied at Shoulder (TAS)

Short Back Cross Carry with a Candy Cane Chest Belt (CCCB)

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Carry Of The Week: Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry

COTW for the week of August 5th is: Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry

This week our carry of the week is Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry (CRBC). As we proceed with our Carry of the Week, we are starting to work with some carries that will fall into the “advanced babywearing” category, so if a particular carry looks intimidating or you try it and quite get it right, don’t give up! It takes practice, and those of us who have successfully mastered this carry probably looked and felt just like you the first time we tried it!

Christina’s Ruckless is a multi-layer back carry that can be an extremely comfortable carry for those who don’t like ruck straps. It is supportive and also a great solution for those leg-straightening babies and toddlers! It is fairly similar to Secure High Back Carry (SHBC), but doesn’t have a knot in the chest belt, so may be a little more comfortable for those bothered by that feature of SHBC.

Christina’s Ruckless can be completed using a size 4-6 wrap, depending on the size of the wearer and child. Please visit our Facebook Group Page for any questions or advice on this carry!

Safety: Stretchy/Knit Wraps (like the Moby) should not, under any circumstances, be used for back carries as their stretchy quality makes them unsafe for anything other than front and hip carries. Keep in mind that if this is your first time doing a back carry, or even this particular carry, you should have a spotter and/or practice over a soft surface such as a bed or a couch. You may even want to practice with a doll or stuffed animal first until you feel comfortable.

Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry

Christina’s Ruckless Back Carry

COTW: Double Hammock (DH)

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COTW for the week of July 15th is: Double Hammock (DH)

This week’s carry is one of the most popular (and supportive) back carries. The Double Hammock (DH) – also called a Chunei Back Carry – is a great back carry that keeps both toddlers and babies nice and secure, and most woven wrap babywearers will tell you how much they love a Double Hammock! This carry uses a longer wrap and includes two rebozo passes across baby’s back, a horizontal chest pass, and ruck-style shoulder straps.

Why we like it…the Double Hammock centers the weight to your chest so you aren’t using just your shoulders for support. It’s multilayered, making it fabulous to support a heavier child or carry for lengthy periods of time. The DH is also great for those wiggle worms and ideal for small babies and bigger ones alike.

Generally considered one of the most comfortable carries, the Double Hammock has a bit of a learning curve, but it’s one back carry definitely worth learning! The key to a good Double Hammock is a nice snug chest pass. It may take a few tries, but once you get this carry down, you’ll love the support it gives!

We have featured not only the classic carry to learn and review, but also a few interesting variations and finishes. A different finish or chest belt can redistribute weight and change the feel of the entire carry. Try it out and let us know what you think!

Check back in next week to see what wrap carry we’ll feature next!

Safety: Stretchy/Knit Wraps must not be used for Back Carries. Please keep in mind that if this is your first time doing a back carry, or even this particular carry, you should have a spotter and/or practice over a soft surface such as a bed or a couch. You can even practice with a doll or stuffed animal first until you feel comfortable.

Double Hammock with a Woven Wrap

Double Hammock with Tips for a Snug Chest Pass

Double Hammock Tied at Shoulder (DH TAS)

Double Hammock Tied at Shoulder (DH TAS)

Double Hammock with a Toddler

Double Hammock: Alternate Finishes
Double Hammock: Tied Tibetan and Sternum Strap Chestbelt

Double Hammock Double Rings (DH-DR)

Double Hammock Rebozo

Double Hammock Rebozo with Sling Ring Finish

COTW: Robin’s Hip Carry (RHC)

COTW for the week of July 8th is: Robin’s Hip Carry (RHC)

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COTW for the week of July 8th is: Robin’s Hip Carry (RHC)

This week’s carry is the Robin’s Hip Carry (RHC). Hip carries are a great option for many babywearers, and are great to use for infants (with head control) and toddlers alike. Many wearers find hip carries a little less challenging to wrap than back carries, and love the fact that it is easier to accomplish many tasks that can be frustrating due to an obstructed view in a front carry.

Hip carries are also a great solution to the “my baby likes to face out” problem that many parents experience. Like a high back carry, a hip carry allows baby to see out, but also provides a safe and natural retreat against the parent’s (or caregiver’s) chest when they start to experience too much stimulation or become sleepy.

Robin’s Hip Carry (RHC) is a great carry for shorter durations, and for babies who can sit on their own. This carry is quite versatile since you can use a longer wrap (6 or 7) and tie in back, a shorter wrap (3 or 4) and tie under bum. RHC may look a little complicated, but it is fairly quick and easy to learn. It is also a comfortable and easy carry to nurse in and for laying down a sleeping baby. RHC can be modified to a front carry (tummy-to-tummy), and also has a variation using a sling ring.

The key to the RHC is getting the shoulder/back passes smooth and evenly spread, and placing the “anchor point” high to achieve optimal comfort and to protects against leaning. Similar to a ring sling, the anchor point – where the wrap crosses/twists at the shoulder – should be where one would wear a brooch or pin (between collar bone and top of breast).

Try it out and let us know what you think…and be sure to come back next week to see what wrap carry we’ll feature next! Happy Babywearing!

Robin’s Hip Carry (with a longer wrap)

Robin’s Hip Carry (with a shorter wrap)

Robin’s Hip Carry

Robin’s Hip Carry with a Sling Ring (aka Leigh’s Robin’s Hip Carry)

COTW: Double Rebozo Shoulder to Shoulder (DRS2S)

COTW for the week of July 1st is: Double Rebozo Shoulder to Shoulder (DRS2S)

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COTW for the week of July 1st is: Double Rebozo Shoulder to Shoulder (DRS2S)

This carry may look a little complex but it’s still very easy to learn. It is a great secure back carry and is quite comfortable and supportive. The unique chest belt is a great alternative to ruck straps and the Rebozo passes over baby are super smooth and allow great support for baby.

The DRS2S can be done using a size 3-7 wrap. With a shorter wrap you would just leave the tails hanging in front and with a longer wrap you would tie under bum. There are no bulky knots to dig in your chest, and if you tie the tails behind your back, there’s no knot at your waist, either. Another plus is that baby can be worn nice and high. Try it out and let us know what you think!

SAFETY: Keep in mind that if this is your first time doing a back carry, or even this particular carry, you should have a spotter and/or practice over a soft surface such as a bed or a couch. You can even practice with a doll or stuffed animal first until you feel comfortable.

Check back in next week to see what wrap carry we’ll feature next!

Double Rebozo Shoulder to Shoulder (DRS2S)

Double Rebozo Shoulder to Shoulder (DRS2S)

COTW: Jordan’s Back Carry (JBC)

COTW for the week of June 24th is: Jordan’s Back Carry (JBC)

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COTW for the week of June 24th is: Jordan’s Back Carry (JBC)

The Jordan’s Back Carry (JBC) is a popular multi-layer, high back carry using a medium-long to long wrap, depending on wrapper size and wrapping options; the Half JBC can be done with less wrap length than the standard JBC and its variations. This carry works well for wiggly babies, and is also great for arms-in, or arms-out positioning.

JBC can be done with some variations, including a Half JBC, two cross passes, two Rebozo passes, as well as an option for a chestbelt (great for beginners!).

Standard JBC

JBC Variation

JBC with 2 Rebozo Passes

JBC with a Chestbelt

Half JBC with a CCCB (Candy-Cane Chest Belt)